Jim Siergey: Super Session

February 17th, 2017

There’s a small group of us, a quintet of guys who have known one another for most of each others’ lives, which has been a considerable amount of time, that meet up for an occasional lunch.

O, the discussions we have over our repasts! The fabled Algonquin Round Table would be not only impressed but envious as well. Our discussions are filled with thoughtful musings, philosophical bantering, and anecdotal administerings.

The topics we cover are many and varied; music, science, politics, the arts, you name it. We balance ourselves on lofty perches as we consume what are generally unbalanced lunches.

One such ethereal subject that we delved into to some degree was “Supergirl”.

We all remembered the Supergirl comic books. There were Superboy comics too but Superboy became Superman. Who did Supergirl become? None of us recall any Superwoman (note to reading public: All women are super, aren’t they?) comic books. Where did she come from? We know where Super Boy/Man came from and how but…Super Girl?

Someone needed to get to the bottom of this and that someone was me. Where trivia is involved, I will always answer the call to duty.

That evening, just after sunset and before “Modern Family” came on, I retired to my own Fortress of Solitude, the computer room. There I donned my green eyeshade and Google Gloves™ and began delving.

Supergirl was born of newsprint, then swept away to celluloid and now dabbled in digital as well because I know there is and have been “Super Girl” TV shows and movies but I’ve never seen any of them so if there was an origin explanation anywhere in any of those productions, I am unaware of it…or them.

supergirl1Don’t mess with Supergirl…

 

Besides, I was interested in the comic book explanation and origin story of Supergirl so into the depths of Googledom I dove.

From what I could ascertain from the various sources I found, Supergirl was introduced in Action Comics #252 in 1959. In this story Superman stumbles upon a crashed spaceship and discovers teenage Kara Zor-El, who introduces herself as his cousin!

Unlike the premise of The Patty Duke Show, which wouldn’t appear for a few more years, they were not identical cousins…outside of their super powers and regalia of red and blue.

Kara adopts Linda Lee (the Superman world loved those double L’s) as her alter-ego moniker and instead of wearing glasses to conceal her identity, she hides her blonde hair under a dark-haired wig. The cartoonists, obviously influenced by the attire of the women in the All-American Girls’ Baseball League, chose to clothe Supergirl in a blue miniskirt rather than tights or shorts.

(Yes, I can type with my tongue lodged in my cheek.)

Okay, so that was the lame origin story of Supergirl, as we all should have expected. But this question still lingers… does Supergirl remain a girl forever? Does she ever reach womanhood?

For that matter, what about Superman? He aged and grew from Superboy into Superman. Why doesn’t he age any further?

We Boomers could use a Super Senior Citizen Man, fighting such blackguards as Paul Ryan and Mitch McConnell to save Social Security and Medicare for us Golden Agers and following generations.

But, If Superman did age, would he suffer from Super Arthritis? How would cataracts affect his Super Vision? How would his knees hold up from all that leaping over buildings in a single bound?

I guess that’s a discussion for another lunch.

 

Editor’s Note: Jim’s last post for The Third City was It’s Alright, Ma

 

 

 

 

One Response to “Jim Siergey: Super Session”

  1. Mike the mad SERB says:

    Linda Lee is forever young because she’s found the Fountain of Ute somewhere out West. SM suffers from dementia and was last seen at an old folks home in Cicero.

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